«Aller avec Maigret» — Finished Simenon’s (first) Maigret detective novel: somehow I know that I read this one and many others about the inspector from Paris a long time ago. It’s a thrilling tale even though the writing seems often clumsy, take for example the shouting (rather than telling) which is inserted whenever the action is heating up: something like “MAIGRET GUNNED HIM DOWN!” … you can practically hear how every letter is capitalized. What can I learn from this book? For example how inspector Maigret’s physiognomy and nature lend a particular speed to all action so that whenever the plot is accelerating, an attractive gap appears, alongside the question: will this throw Maigret off-balance? At last he loses his cool when his much loved colleague is murdered: from then on the book runs its course like an avalanche. … 

[Continue reading][This post was first published in German][Photo: still from a film with Rupert Davies as inspector Maigret—when this was broadcast in 1965 in Germany, the streets were swept and everyone was glued to the tiny, black and white TV screens. Not that I was there but that’s what they say. Today, 1965 seems like 1865.]

Posted at 6:35pm.

«Aller avec Maigret» — Finished Simenon’s (first) Maigret detective novel: somehow I know that I read this one and many others about the inspector from Paris a long time ago. It’s a thrilling tale even though the writing seems often clumsy, take for example the shouting (rather than telling) which is inserted whenever the action is heating up: something like “MAIGRET GUNNED HIM DOWN!” … you can practically hear how every letter is capitalized. What can I learn from this book? For example how inspector Maigret’s physiognomy and nature lend a particular speed to all action so that whenever the plot is accelerating, an attractive gap appears, alongside the question: will this throw Maigret off-balance? At last he loses his cool when his much loved colleague is murdered: from then on the book runs its course like an avalanche. … 
[Continue reading][This post was first published in German][Photo: still from a film with Rupert Davies as inspector Maigret—when this was broadcast in 1965 in Germany, the streets were swept and everyone was glued to the tiny, black and white TV screens. Not that I was there but that’s what they say. Today, 1965 seems like 1865.]
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