Thank You For Your Sperm" (MadHat Press, 2013) is Marcus Speh's debut collection of short fiction with 80 stories and an interview with the author. — Order the book now via Amazon.com.

RECYCLING FACEBOOK?

«Originally, I only wanted to share a few posts from Facebook over at my blog. But then, as I was entering photos, adding comments, going back and forth between the worlds, this turned into a major undertaking: I may do this again next year but not before. 27 historical posts lined up commented beaten into blog submission featuring Frank Hinton |Christopher Allen | Christopher Forsley |Sheldon Lee Compton | Fictionaut | Thrice Fiction MagazineALT LIT GOSSIP (SPREAD)Beach Sloth | Anis Shivani |Aotearoa Affair: A Blog Fest From Kiel to Kaitaia | … and many more.The answer to the unasked question is of course: you cannot recycle anything online. This is besides the valid point that most online content is recycled already (personally, I like to contribute original content but I can’t always do that); but there is a deeper reason: blogs, Facebook, twitter, they are all living systems, not can collections. Interacting with any part of the system changes the system as a whole. More specifically: as I was setting out to merely rehash old statements, my thinking changed and I felt drawn into changing both my course and my communication, and the posts I wanted to copy had changed, too, because of comments and “likes” and this and that… I wonder if this is not like editing a major piece of writing, or painting a large canvas or a fresco perhaps (the Michelangelo way: fifty people working on one ceiling…) Over to you…»

[Continue reading…] [Image: Ouroboros in German Civil Heraldry, City of Herongen, via Wikimedia]

Posted at 8:50pm.

RECYCLING FACEBOOK? 
«Originally, I only wanted to share a few posts from Facebook over at my blog. But then, as I was entering photos, adding comments, going back and forth between the worlds, this turned into a major undertaking: I may do this again next year but not before. 27 historical posts lined up commented beaten into blog submission featuring Frank Hinton |Christopher Allen | Christopher Forsley |Sheldon Lee Compton | Fictionaut | Thrice Fiction Magazine| ALT LIT GOSSIP (SPREAD)| Beach Sloth | Anis Shivani |Aotearoa Affair: A Blog Fest From Kiel to Kaitaia | … and many more.…The answer to the unasked question is of course: you cannot recycle anything online. This is besides the valid point that most online content is recycled already (personally, I like to contribute original content but I can’t always do that); but there is a deeper reason: blogs, Facebook, twitter, they are all living systems, not can collections. Interacting with any part of the system changes the system as a whole. More specifically: as I was setting out to merely rehash old statements, my thinking changed and I felt drawn into changing both my course and my communication, and the posts I wanted to copy had changed, too, because of comments and “likes” and this and that… I wonder if this is not like editing a major piece of writing, or painting a large canvas or a fresco perhaps (the Michelangelo way: fifty people working on one ceiling…) Over to you…»
[Continue reading…] [Image: Ouroboros in German Civil Heraldry, City of Herongen, via Wikimedia]
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Notes: