Thank You For Your Sperm" (MadHat Press, 2013) is Marcus Speh's debut collection of short fiction with 80 stories and an interview with the author. — Order the book now via Amazon.com.

There was a time when we were all elephant men. Sure, it wasn’t always easy to negotiate two such different halves, but there were noticeable rewards. You never know what a trunk can do until you have one and can control its finest movements. And then there are the large elephant ears, which make wonderful windbreakers and keep you warm like a sweater made of skin. If, on the other hand, you wish to know what’s so great about being grafted to a human body from the point of view of the elephant half, you have to ask the elephants themselves. I do know that they are envious of our small noses and ears, and that there is a large faction among them who would love to play piano. As it is, we’ve developed in different directions. While the elephants had to give up making music on manual instruments, we had to give up mud baths and wrestling with tusks. Some say, that by shedding our elephant side, men have lost masculinity, but prominent feminists have proven again and again that this is not true. Human scientists of different denominations have developed theories and models to show that the elephant man was an evolutionary aberration, the wrong path, taken mindlessly and therefore doomed. In any case, all this, if it happened at all, happened a long time ago. The elephant men have turned into dream people. Instead of evoking awe they’re considered to be freaks, which is too bad. I wish our ability to handle ambivalence and dichotomy were more highly developed. -ms

[#68/1000][Copyright © 2012 Marcus Speh]

Posted at 8:46am and tagged with: 100 days 2012, art, drawing, elephants, lit, elephant man,.

There was a time when we were all elephant men. Sure, it wasn’t always easy to negotiate two such different halves, but there were noticeable rewards. You never know what a trunk can do until you have one and can control its finest movements. And then there are the large elephant ears, which make wonderful windbreakers and keep you warm like a sweater made of skin. If, on the other hand, you wish to know what’s so great about being grafted to a human body from the point of view of the elephant half, you have to ask the elephants themselves. I do know that they are envious of our small noses and ears, and that there is a large faction among them who would love to play piano. As it is, we’ve developed in different directions. While the elephants had to give up making music on manual instruments, we had to give up mud baths and wrestling with tusks. Some say, that by shedding our elephant side, men have lost masculinity, but prominent feminists have proven again and again that this is not true. Human scientists of different denominations have developed theories and models to show that the elephant man was an evolutionary aberration, the wrong path, taken mindlessly and therefore doomed. In any case, all this, if it happened at all, happened a long time ago. The elephant men have turned into dream people. Instead of evoking awe they’re considered to be freaks, which is too bad. I wish our ability to handle ambivalence and dichotomy were more highly developed. -ms
[#68/1000][Copyright © 2012 Marcus Speh]
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